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Holiday Savings Event 2022 Shopping Advice Thread: What’s in Your Basket?
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Re: Holiday Savings Event 2022 Shopping Advice Thread: What’s in Your Basket?
BOSS III INSIDER
Reply: @CynthieLu To make the YTTP thing even more interesting: if I recall correctly, it was a cosmetic chemist or someone from that de ...read more
@CynthieLu To make the YTTP thing even more interesting: if I recall correctly, it was a cosmetic chemist or someone from that dept. (vs. a customer service rep) who replied to our emails. And this was before L’Oréal bought the brand. Eh, their new parent company should give me more confidence in the brand when it comes to formulations and providing honest info. I do appreciate that they now list out so many of the fragrance components in some of their products. About your question: in the US, per the FDA, all ingredients must be listed in order of highest to lowest concentration. Exceptions are any ingredient that's: SpoilerAt or below 1% concentration - these still must be listed, but not in concentration order. So if a product uses 2% alpha, 2.1% omega, 1% beta, 0.5% gamma, and 0.2% delta, the ingredients must be listed as: omega, alpha, [in any order: beta, delta, gramma]. Sometimes things at/below 1% are listed in alphabetical order. FDA-classified as a drug - these are listed before all other ingredients as “active ingredients.” Common skincare examples are salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, adapalene, and hydroquinone. Note that retinol and retinal (retinaldehyde) don’t qualify because the FDA calls them cosmetic ingredients, not drugs. Retinol and retinal are not FDA-approved for acne control, but adapalene is. Arbutin's not a skin-brightening drug, but hydroquinone is. Trade secret ingredients - things the FDA has exempted from public disclosure (there's a whole process companies must go through to get that exemption). If a product contains secret-sauce-zeta, and the FDA has said “yep, Brand X can keep secret-sauce-zeta a secret from competitors,” then it’ll appear at the end of the ingredients list as “and other ingredients.” That’s not necessarily the same thing as trade name ingredients, which should still be listed—but not as their trade names. SpoilerTrade name ingredients are usually listed as their INCI/Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary names, which could be a combo of ingredients. Example: The Inkey List Retinol uses RetiSTAR™, a trade name ingredient created by BASF as a “stabilized retinol." The actual INCI name is “Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride (and) Sodium Ascorbate (and) Tocopherol (and) Retinol.” You’ll find all 4 of those ingredients on that product’s ingredient label, listed in order of concentration. Color additives - even if their concentration’s above 1%, these can appear in any order after all other ingredients that aren’t color additives. This category includes titanium dioxide and all those "D&C [color] No. [x]" ingredients you usually see on makeup labels. Incidental ingredients - usually something that was added and then removed to help chemists formulate a product. If it remains in the finished product, it should be present at an insignificant level and have no functional effect. These ingredients don’t have to be listed at all. At or below 1% concentration - these still must be listed, but not in concentration order. So if a product uses 2% alpha, 2.1% omega, 1% beta, 0.5% gamma, and 0.2% delta, the ingredients must be listed as: omega, alpha, [in any order: beta, delta, gramma]. Sometimes things at/below 1% are listed in alphabetical order. FDA-classified as a drug - these are listed before all other ingredients as “active ingredients.” Common skincare examples are salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, adapalene, and hydroquinone. Note that retinol and retinal (retinaldehyde) don’t qualify because the FDA calls them cosmetic ingredients, not drugs. Retinol and retinal are not FDA-approved for acne control, but adapalene is. Arbutin's not a skin-brightening drug, but hydroquinone is. Trade secret ingredients - things the FDA has exempted from public disclosure (there's a whole process companies must go through to get that exemption). If a product contains secret-sauce-zeta, and the FDA has said “yep, Brand X can keep secret-sauce-zeta a secret from competitors,” then it’ll appear at the end of the ingredients list as “and other ingredients.” That’s not necessarily the same thing as trade name ingredients, which should still be listed—but not as their trade names. Trade name ingredients are usually listed as their INCI/Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary names, which could be a combo of ingredients. Example: The Inkey List Retinol uses RetiSTAR™, a trade name ingredient created by BASF as a “stabilized retinol." The actual INCI name is “Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride (and) Sodium Ascorbate (and) Tocopherol (and) Retinol.” You’ll find all 4 of those ingredients on that product’s ingredient label, listed in order of concentration. Color additives - even if their concentration’s above 1%, these can appear in any order after all other ingredients that aren’t color additives. This category includes titanium dioxide and all those "D&C [color] No. [x]" ingredients you usually see on makeup labels. Incidental ingredients - usually something that was added and then removed to help chemists formulate a product. If it remains in the finished product, it should be present at an insignificant level and have no functional effect. These ingredients don’t have to be listed at all. For all the nitty gritty on this stuff, read FDA regulation 21 CFR 701.3 or check the cosmetics labeling guide at the FDA’s site. I don't recall if/how Canada's regulations differ.
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2022 PRODUCT RELEASES THREAD!!!
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Re: 2022 PRODUCT RELEASES THREAD!!!
BOSS III INSIDER
Reply: @Nahnom Welp, guess I'll add the blush mini set to my list of potential Sephora holiday event buys.  I just watched the Instagra ...read more
@Nahnom Welp, guess I'll add the blush mini set to my list of potential Sephora holiday event buys. 😄 I just watched the Instagram cheek swatch video and Unforgettable looks more pink coral than peach or orange-leaning coral. I'd prefer the latter but I'm already swimming in peach/orange blushes. Grateful looks like a good cool-toned pink. And I don't already have Empower. I can't speak for all Lys's coral blushes, but I do have Inspire and it reads very terracotta on my skin tone. I'm all about a good terracotta blush, so I love it. Next time I'm at a Sephora, I'll have to swatch the other corals for comparison.
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What are you wearing today Pt2
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Re: What are you wearing today Pt2
BOSS I INSIDER
Reply:    
   
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100 Shades of Eyeshadow Challenge
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Re: 100 Shades of Eyeshadow Challenge
BOSS I INSIDER
Reply:    
   
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Ambassador Curated
💕😌 Mask of the Week Challenge 😌💖
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Re: 💕😌 Mask of the Week Challenge 😌💖
BIC Ambassador INSIDER
Reply: @Cissy63, coffee and marshmallow sound like a winning combination, and fitting for a fall treat.  The eye masks are great for a p ...read more
@Cissy63, coffee and marshmallow sound like a winning combination, and fitting for a fall treat. 😍 The eye masks are great for a putting a little pep to the complexion, brightening up the under eyes. Soft and fluffy sounds like the perfect consistency for a marshmallow mask; your results sound fantastic too! I have a mini jar of this bliss mask somewhere in my bin of mask samples; making a note to find it and put it to use.
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Ambassador Curated
Show Me Your Nails 2.0
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Re: Show Me Your Nails 2.0
RISING STAR III INSIDER
Reply: I've never seen a shade like If It Sparkles It's mine. @RGbrown that's a really sweet looking orangey-brown (maybe?) Lol I bet th ...read more
I've never seen a shade like If It Sparkles It's mine. @RGbrown that's a really sweet looking orangey-brown (maybe?) Lol I bet that's going to be a pretty one! It reminds me of a polish I saw at a nail salon forever ago but that one was a darker burnt orange with heavy gold particles throughout. It was lovely tooo 😋
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Outlandishly Ornate October Hauls 2022
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Re: Outlandishly Ornate October Hauls 2022
RISING STAR III INSIDER
Reply: Love it! @Kim888  You should add it to the Year of Beauty Photgraphy Thread 李 ...read more
Love it! @Kim888 🎃 You should add it to the Year of Beauty Photgraphy Thread 🧡🖤
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🌈🦄📦 THE UNICORN MAIL THREAD 📦🦄🌈
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Re: 🌈🦄📦 THE UNICORN MAIL THREAD 📦🦄🌈
BOSS III INSIDER
Reply: You are way too sweet @SportyGirly125 ! Hang on to it if it's limited edition. ...read more
You are way too sweet @SportyGirly125 ! Hang on to it if it's limited edition.💗💗
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Ulta GWPs
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Re: Ulta GWPs
BOSS III INSIDER
Reply: New gwp, item 2602984  
New gwp, item 2602984  
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Ambassador Curated
Monthly Favorites: September 2022 Edition!
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Re: Monthly Favorites: September 2022 Edition!
BIC Ambassador INSIDER
Reply: @GeorginaBT they all SOUND so good! ...read more
@GeorginaBT they all SOUND so good!
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