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We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Sephora Manifesto Text.jpg

 

On the morning of 6/5, every Sephora store, distribution center, and corporate office in the US will close to host inclusion workshops for our employees. These values have always been at the heart of Sephora, and we’re excited to welcome everyone when we reopen. Join us in our commitment to a more inclusive beauty community.

 

We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

They are only closing their stores for one hour; not all day.

Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Love this!


@SephoraBIC wrote:

Sephora Manifesto Text.jpg

 

On the morning of 6/5, every Sephora store, distribution center, and corporate office in the US will close to host inclusion workshops for our employees. These values have always been at the heart of Sephora, and we’re excited to welcome everyone when we reopen. Join us in our commitment to a more inclusive beauty community.

 

We Belong to Something Beautiful.


 

Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

An hour, ONE HOUR of "training" people to be courteous?  

Customer service at any Sephora I've visited has always been abysmal (read "non-existent")--with the single exception of a delightful, helpful black salesperson at your English Village (Montgomeryville, PA) store.

Sephora salespeople are "trained" enough to feel free to ignore customers or, to follow black customers as we shop, or, when salespeople DO bother to approach or respond, they are comfortable being rude/dismissive/arrogant.

Does Sephora management truly think that what appears to be the norm in the behavior of its employees can be resolved by an hour of diversity training what IS that, anyway?  Oh, you mean treat all customers respectfully/leave your racism at home)? 

Frankly, Sephora and staff are free to think what you like; I'm not interested in changing your attitude, as much as the behavior

And by the way, who's "different?"  "Different" from what/whom?  This statement alone indicates belief in a white normative.

RE: Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Diversity training can be very useful - maybe one hour isn’t adequate because there’s a lot to cover but personally I wish more people understood Tourette’s better. I dated a man with Tourette’s for 2 years and we got kicked out of restaurants a few times because people assumed that the small involuntary jerky movements + plus little sounds he made meant that he was on drugs. It was a mild form of Tourette’s - not enough to bother other diners - and other than not being able to help making little sound and movements the person is completely in control. That’s an example of something that could be covered in diversity training - this is what this looks like and it doesn’t mean the person is on drugs etc etc etc.

Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@slammindee the statement was « standing fearlessly together to celebrate our differences. » As in celebrating all the ways in which one person is different from the next person - as in celebrating all the things that make each person unique - that kind of thing.  There’s no normative position assumed here - all it says is that we should celebrate the differences between people and the ways in which each person is unique. 

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@SephoraBIC This is great to see. I’m feeling sad today because I have a friend who is receiving the most vile and extremely hateful messages from an anonymous person and it’s so heartbreaking that people still have to deal with things like this in 2019. I know that sensitivity isalways a good thing sometimes people can even be hurtful without meaning to be and I think that’s where this kind of training really helps. I always try to calmly challenge people when I think they’re being unwittingly insensitive but I try to explain why I feel the thing is insensitive because I find it’s easier to change their minds that way. As a result I’ve had this conversation with people so many times over the years where they will say something and I’ll explain why I believe they need to understand the impact what they’re saying can have on other people and sometimes people will say something like “well if a person finds this offensive they’re being oversensitive or they can’t take a joke”. My request for people who tend to think that often is often to really ask themselves how important that statement or unfunny joke is - is it so important that it’s worth hurting people? I do think it’s important and significant to make a larger goal like this - setting a larger goal like creating a culture of inclusivity where everyone feels welcome provides a sort of guide and framework for all the smaller decisions that have to be madeand provides a clear message about the kind of values that are important whether it be to an individual person or company.

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@Weetart sorry I am most definitely the one who needs to get off her soapbox not you! Lol sorry for the blabber and thanks so much for your response! : )

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Lol @RoseCharlie no need to apologize to me! I enjoyed reading your posts and any discussions/papers/etc on feminist and queer theory, which you have a knack for. Smiley Happy

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

You hit on a lot of great points. @RoseCharlie . We don’t know what it’s like to be in another ones shoes. And if the joke is hurtful, the one telling it should be okay with admitting it’s a bad joke and learning why it was bad. We all say stupid things sometimes, but it’s so important to own it when you screw up and make changes. It is possible to be funny without insulting people! If you do, ask why it was insulting and don’t judge them learn! It’s okay to make mistakes. Sorry 😐 I’ll get off my soapbox

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@Weetart or sometimes maybe it’s not even specifically about discrimination but it’s just about approaching the world with more kindness. I worked with a woman who had a habit of coming to speak with me when I was busy and it was always to say something about another person that I didn’t want to hear and that I found sort of mean-spirited and uncomfortable and after it happened twice I tried to say something without sounding too self-righteous but basically I just said that there were so many interesting things that we could be discussing but that I had no interest in discussing what someone else is eating or wearing if it’s not a compliment it would often be at the expense of another woman and I was trying to say her body or whAt she puts on it is not a subject of conversation that I think is appropriate it’s none of my business and I think that when we speak about each other like this we create a world and a culture that’s meaner for all of us to live in. The person being discussed is most affected in the moment but ultimately I think that when we allow these small cruelties to pass unchecked or to be brought out as «concern » when it clearly isn’t real concern or a real cause for it we are creating the building blocks of a world that’s worse for every single one of us. I said that I would be happier and she would also be happier if our every move and pound and effort wasn’t judged so harshly or subject to negative scrutiny and that part of the argument seemed to maybe have an impact. I think maybe it could have made a difference - at the very least the woman didn’t come to speak with me about those kinds of things again so at least there was that bonus to speaking up lol.

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@RoseCharlie   I love how you handled the situation with your co-worker.  Maybe I'm naive, but I feel like you can't go wrong with treating others the way you would want to be treated, and say, "I'm sorry" when needed.  It's not that difficult.

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@Ispend2much6 Thank you so much!! : ) that particular situation hit on a lot of points i dislike like when people claim to be « concerned » about someone but they’re really just looking to say something mean and I also kind of feel like there are so many people who feel it’s ok to be hypercritical about the way women look and about their bodies and they speak about it in a way I’ve never heard anyone speak about a man’s looks or body.  Just in my own personal experience I’ve had so many people - casual acquaintances and stangers - come talk to me about my weight or weight gains or losses and I find it so galling like how is that ok? Like even strangers on the street coming up to me and saying « you know you have a pretty face if you just excercised and lost a little weight blah blah blah » (that’s happened about 4-5 times lol) which kind of blows my mind because I could never in a million years imagine myself talking to a stranger like that.  I think you’re totally right - it’s important to say sorry when we are wrong and it’s not that hard but I think some people have a really really hard time admitting when they are wrong - I mean no one likes being wrong but some people would rather hurt anyone or suffer any consequence than admit when they are wrong.  I mean it’s never fun to be wrong but without the ability to admit it we can have no self awareness. I had a very unpleasant neighbour who could never admit when she was wrong and she would do the most stunning ethical and mental contortions to justify everything she did but she paid such a heavy price because that lack of self awareness made her bitter and demanding and very unfair and cruel  to others and she could never keep anyone around her when they got to know her - she could never hold on to any job for more than a couple months either - she was always complaining about how all people were terrible and rotten and she spent all her time proactively seeking out people but she always ended up alone and without a single friend and everyone was always wrong - everyone but her.  I thought that it must be very lonely to feel that way. That’s sort of an extreme example but I always think of it when I have to excercise self-awareness and it’s unpleasant and I would prefer to blame someone else for my predicament - like a cautionary tale of sorts. 

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@RoseCharlie   I know people who are like the one you described as an extreme example.  The ones that I have known, without fail, were ones that were put in a position of needing to be an adult when they were children, (could have been caused by a necessity such as a death in the family, but the most extreme cases I've seen were due to neglect and selfishness.)  It is sad, because as kids they were emotionally abandoned and lost that opportunity to be nurtured and secure.  So, they cut themselves off emotionally to protect themselves and carry that into adulthood where it develops into bitterness.  But until they want to change, no amount of kindness or unconditional acceptance will help them, which is a shame because people will try, and it would be better for everyone else if they did. Smiley Wink

 

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@Ispend2much6 oh WoW - i was thunderstruck by your post because this was PRECISELY the case with this person! This person had terrible things happen to her when she was little and no adults protected her.  Wow. WOW! Knowing this was the reason I tried so hard for so long but I couldn’t help and it only ever got worse... That is helpful to read though because everyone always thought I was being stupid to try and at least I see that there’s a commonality there - a certain legacy of pain that maybe makes trying worthwhile for a time. 

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@RoseCharlie   Thanks for responding!  Most of the time I may have crackpot theories, but every once in awhile they're proven true. Smiley Happy  And I admire you for trying to help that woman.  You're not crazy, you just have hope.

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Thanks @Ispend2much6  : ) that’s nice of you to say! Thank YOU for responding! I was seriously impressed when you said that - I think you might be an oracle! One thing I can say about that woman is there was never a dull moment and her antics could be pretty funny when they weren’t damaging to herself or others. She once stayed at my house while she was getting renovations done so I gave her my key so that she could be there while I was at the office - when I got home she had reorganized my library by book size and colour (i had it organized into pretty recognizable subject areas like « biographies » and « volumes of history » etc.) and she had packed a couple of garbage bags full of things she told me she was taking home because « she needed it more than I did » but it wasnt anything very expensive like gold jewelry it was things like Lysol wipes and toothbrushes and soaps, bedsheets, some clothing and a few products and mainly non-spoiling food items - a lot of my tea.  I mean it was sort of annoying but also quite funny because I knew I could talk her into leaving anything I didn’t want her to take away but mostly because she’s the only person I know who would ever do things like that lol. Bwahahahaha. Sorry - maybe that’s not really funny but I found it amusing - I mean (with much difficulty) I convinced her put the library back the next day otherwise I wouldn’t have been quite so amused. 

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@RoseCharlie   I'm glad you could laugh at that.  The "fixing" gene is strong in those poor souls, as is the need to feel taken care of and spoiled (even though you did it inadvertently. lol)  You are a very kind person.  If she was with me she would have had to leave the tea.  I like the good stuff. Smiley Happy

Re: RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@Ispend2much6 bwahahaha « the fixing gene » that’s sooooooo truuuue lol! My gosh it’s like you know this person  - I really am amazed this is truly impressive - wow! Wisedom! You are right, the good stuff is a bit harder to stomach I wasn’t really happy with so much of my tea going missing - I did have to negotiate a more reasonable amount of tea to « gift » her with lol. 

RE: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

Thank you @Weetart! : ) I think the point you’re making is an important one too - there are some situations where people can even say the wrong thing without meaning to or realizing they said something that’s not intended as a slur but that has certain historical connotations. Like I think a good example of something like that would be to be slightly dismissing someonw - especially a woman - by describing them as « hysterical » and people might not know the ugly history that exists behind the notion of women being « hysterical » and of the terrible things inflicted on women branded as such by the medical community in centuries past. I think you’re totally right and the point is an important one - we are all capable of saying the wrong thing and no one knows everything. If someone had no bad intent and they’re willing to learn I think it’s also important not to try humiliate someone who made an honest mistake. Like for example one thing I try to explain to people - because I worked with older people for a decade - is to try and make them understand that sometimes when they think they’re being nice in the way they speak to seniors they’re actually being kind of patronizing. - I mean things like calling seniors « dear » or « honey » when they don’t know them - I know that a lot of people on the receiving end of those adjectives find it a bit insufferable but I also know that people doing it often don’t realize they’re treating that person differently, they are not trying to be rude they just don’t know the impact their words are having. It’s important to learn and it’s also important to let people learn if they’re making an honest mistake.

Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

I hope this includes people over 50. Because I’m tired of being discriminated against.  All the magazines and television ads include young people, gay people and  people of color but you hardly ever see people over 50. And the looks you get from everyone. It’s outrageous. Talk about being cast aside. That’s how I feel. And my feelings matter. 

Re: We Belong to Something Beautiful.

@sbeechl  I read an interesting article about Kohl’s and J.C. Penney yesterday. JCP admits they lost sight of their primary customer by chasing millennials. They realized they can’t win millennials and now the older customers have moved on. It seems so many companies focus on one age group.  It’s such a poor way to do business. People have lots of options and will just leave if they feel unwanted.