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Post in Perfume Posse

Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Reading through the posts here on BT I often come across posters using the description "grandma smell" or "old lady perfume" when describing a scent. It's starting to concern me a bit because I really don't want that to be the thought that pops into someone's head when they catch a bit of my perfume.

 

I wear mostly newer scents by Armani, Dolce&Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, Vera Wang, etc.. But I also have some classics in my collection like YSL Opium, Chanel No19 and Chanel No22.

 

So my question is-- if I wear a fragrance that's been around longer than many Grandma's do you think of your Grandma when I walk by?

 

At 26, that's not my goal when I get dressed in the morning Smiley Happy 

Should I ditch the classics and stick with the new stuff?

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I think of Grandma fragrance as an overpowering flowery-powder smell, so if your perfume falls in that category, then I'd skip it (or give it to your grandmother, lol). I think Opium, though stronger smelling, doesn't fall into Grandma territory, the others I just think of as classics. 

My personal preference is to have a library of scents for the changing seasons and my different moods, so as long as you skip the flowery-powdery kind, I think you'll be ok.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Thanks Prettyinpa!  That's a good guideline. Now I have a better description of what to avoid. 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Prettyinpa nailed it! Smiley Happy

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I also find in addition to the "grandma" scent description aside from the actual smell is the strength and overwhelmingness of the fragrance. I think aging is sometimes correlated with losing or the dulling of one's abilities (eye sight worsens for example) so the sense of smell isn't what it used to be so there may be the tendency to go a bit overboard or maybe even not be as aware that too much is sprayed/applied.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Then why do young girls at the school I teach in smell like Bath and Bodyworks and/or Victoria's Secret threw up all over them? Smiley Very Happy I tell them all the time that less is more. Same thing goes for their makeup. And don't get me started with the boys and their Axe products, oy vey!

 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

That's hilarious LCResz Smiley Happy

I actually have a friend who I will not hug because of Axe.  It sticks to me if I get too close Smiley Happy

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

@DoctorsMrs - this is exactly what happens to me too - not so much with Axe specifically, but I have a friend who just drenches himself in Aqua di Gio and it would transfer to me if I'm within 2-3 feet of him!  Yikes!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Because sadly, young girls and guys don't know the meaning of moderation! Haha! They take a whiff of a scent and go "That's niceeee!" So they think "If that smells nice, of course me spraying more means I will smell nice!" Smiley Tongue

 

In regards to their make up, don't even get me started.....that can tie into a whole load of not having someone around to sit them down and teach them moderation and appropriate application techniques to pop culture and media leading the youth to want to grow up and look more "mature" than what they actually are. Oye vey indeed!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Haaahaaa... you're so funny!  I can't agree more with everything you said!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

When I think of grandma scents, a giant puff of talcum powder comes to mind. These scents tend to have a powdery dry down, may have rose as a prominent note, and nary a hint of fruit or spice. It has nothing to do with how long the perfume's been around, just who is more likely to be rocking it, in my opinion.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I now have an image of grandmas worldwide always making an entrance in a giant puff of talcum powder. xD

I think "grandma smell" is definitely in the neighborhood of smelling overpoweringly like rose or lavender--maybe it's just smelling like the scent was dumped on though.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I hoped there would be a good specific explanation here. So powder is the big issue. Roses and straight up florals can be trouble too.  So far my collection is safe Smiley Happy

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I agree that it's an overwhelming smell of powder or strong rosy smelling scents and there's a big difference in the fragrances you have by YSL and Chanel to me classy scents speak for themselves.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

i always associate the term with musky

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Ah, a common misconception, however musky scents are "womanly" or "grown up," which I suppose that to a certain demographic may as well be "grandma." But then I think overly sweet smelling scents are "immature" while others simply refer to them as "young." 

 

Ex. I received Purr from a well-meaning friend who went by a SA's suggestion due to the popularity. I tried it and my husband hated it, but some of my students loved it. However when I wear Michael Kors Rose Gold my husband goes nuts but I think it smells a bit too mature for me. So different strokes for different folks and all that Smiley Happy

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I would guess something dramatic and strong smelling also "powdery". It just so happen that the older perfumes are more concentrated (or anything eau de parfum) meant to be used sparingly. A lot of the newer fragrances are eau de toilette so they seem lighter. I think you should stick to what you like!

 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

people say grandma smells, like its bad, I disagree, I love the way my grandma smells, she wears Calvin Klein obsession, and I think it smells good. Like all grandmas smell the same? I say stick with what your wearing,  even the Chanel 19 and 22, these scents are classic, and anyone who tells you that you smell like a grandma, is small minded. I think fragrance is an experience and sets a mood, not a age.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

@pinkonyx,  This is a great answer. I agree, grandma doesn't have to be a bad smell. I was just referring to how people use the term when describing fragrance. And of course, not all grandmas smell the same. 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I'm not sure if you've ever smelled Red Door by Elizabeth Arden, I think its something in that category. And as others have said, a strong smell. Grandma doesn't have to be bad, i usually associate it with my grandma!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

White Diamonds

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