What's on your plate?

What's on your plate?

Hello there, ladies and gents!

 

Keeping in line with all the fun and interactive threads asking about your most recent halls, items you have your eyes on, what you're currently wearing, what's your hair routine, and more, I've decide to branch out and ask:

 

"What's on your plate?"

 

The beauty world doesn't just stop at skin care and cosmetics, it also goes hand in hand with your overall health and well-being, so with that, I'm curious to see what we're all chowing down and snacking on be it for breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, or inbetween!

 

For those with apps that help count calories or to those who just want to keep a log, here's a place to share, possibly find and share some recipes, and even tips on maintaining a balanced diet.

 

Don't just share food items, but even drinks! I'm a huge fan of tea and at least have a cup of green tea a day (anti-oxidants) and drink plenty of water.

 

For lunch today, I had:

 

-Brown rice

-Steamed egg

-Steamed red snapper with green onion, sesame oil, and black pepper

-Gai lan (it's a type of Chinese vegetable/greens)

 

Now, tell me, Beauty Talk world, what do you have? :smileyvery-happy:

Re: What's on your plate?

Here it is! I hope everything is in there; it's hard to remember every step when I'm not actively making it! Please feel free to ask any questions for additional clarification or tell me if I missed something obvious (or even something not-so-obvious). Oh, and when you try it: Take a picture and tell me how it is! Thanks!

 

Spoiler

Coconut Curry Noodle Soup

Serves 2

Adapted from Thai Curry Noodles with Shrimp by thirschfeld on food52.com

(http://food52.com/recipes/9098-thai-curry-noodles-with-shrimp)

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Notes:

After several mediocre and disappointing attempts at making this last summer, I discovered that the key to really making this recipe well is to use a high quality coconut milk, as the flavor, texture and very performance of the coconut milk is affected by its coconut cream content and other additives. I strongly suggest the AROY-D brand noted in the ingredients list (and shown below in the reference section). Many of the commercially available coconut milks in the US are extremely watered down and include a variety of stabilizers and preservatives; they just don’t perform well in Southeast Asian cooking. The AROY-D coconut milk contains only water and 60% coconut milk (essentially coconut cream), and fully and evenly solidifies when refrigerated – this is a good sign. Quality noodles also make a huge difference; I like King Soba Organic Brown Rice Vermicelli. They are thin mai fun style noodles that actually retain their shape and texture when cooked. Plus, brown rice is healthy (or healthier)! I like this soup with fresh spinach leaves to ensure I eat a well-balanced meal complete with greens and for the texture that they retain when just heated through, but the recipe also works really well with fresh romaine lettuce (or can be made without vegetables if you prefer, but why would you prefer that?).

 

The broth for this recipe is extremely well balanced as written, but is equally as good without the fish sauce for those who cannot eat seafood (just add a bit more salt to taste if the fish sauce is omitted). Because the meat is cooked separately and then added back in, the dish works well with any type of meat – my favorites are chicken and steamed mussels or clams; but I have also made it with beef, without any meat, and served with Vietnamese pork skewers on top. As written, the broth is not very spicy, so I sometimes like to spice it up with a dash of ancho chili powder (this mild chili powder doesn’t change the flavor very much but adds a slight kick) or with chili-infused oil. As I mentioned, the flavor balance of the broth is very finely-tuned, and any alterations to the ingredients should be made slowly and with intermittent tasting and stirring. It’s okay if the broth tastes a little too salty when it’s done; the plain rice noodles will offset that excess when they are combined, as will the acid of the lime juice.

 

Ingredients:

  • Refined high heat canola oil for cooking
  • 1 boneless/skinless chicken breast, fat removed and sliced thinly
  • Brown rice vermicelli noodles (King Soba Organic Brown Rice Vermicelli)
  • 1 medium shallot, sliced thinly into rounds
  • Flour to coat shallots
  • Sea salt
  • 1 medium garlic clove, sliced thinly
  • 2 tsp red curry paste
  • A dash of cumin
  • A dash of turmeric
  • ½ can (7 fl oz) quality coconut milk (AROY-D)
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp coconut aminos (or soy sauce – I use coconut aminos because I am soy intolerant)
  • A dash or two of fish sauce (optional/add to taste)
  • 1 generous tsp dark brown sugar
  • ½ lime, cut into two equal wedges
  • 1 green onion, washed and sliced into rounds
  • 1 small bunch fresh spinach, washed and roughly chopped (or romaine lettuce)

 

Instructions:

  1. Cook sliced chicken in a bit of canola oil in a frying pan. Drain extra oil and water, set chicken aside.
  2. Boil noodles according to package instructions, enough for a small serving in the bottom of each bowl. Drain, divide among bowls, set aside. (I do steps 1 & 2 at the same time first and then reuse the same pans for 3 & 4.)
  3. Toss shallots in flour and salt until fully coated. Fry on medium-high heat in canola oil until just browned and crispy – keep an eye on these and turn regularly to avoid burning. Drain oil, transfer to a dish lined with paper to absorb excess oil, sprinkle with more salt and set aside.
  4. Heat canola oil in saucepan just below medium heat. Add garlic, curry paste, cumin and turmeric and quickly stir into the oil. This should be just fragrant and sizzling. Add the coconut milk, vegetable broth, aminos, fish sauce and brown sugar. Stir to combine.
  5. Bring just to a boil and then simmer for 20 minutes to allow flavors to meld, stirring occasionally. (This is usually when I wash and chop my spinach because there’s a bit of waiting time and I’m bad at prepping everything before I begin cooking.)
  6. Squeeze in juice of ¼ lime, throw in the white parts of the chopped green onion, and add the chicken. Stir and allow to be just heated through – maybe one minute or so.
  7. Divide fresh chopped spinach among bowls, over rice noodles. Spoon out the chicken evenly among bowls. Ladle sauce over.
  8. Garnish with green onions, crispy fried shallots, and serve with 1/8 lime wedge to squeeze over the top.

 

References:
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Re: What's on your plate?

Thanks!

Re: What's on your plate?

Ahhhh, lawrd, this looks and sounds so yummy! Please, do post the recipe here when ready!

Re: What's on your plate?

Will do! I'm just getting every last detail put in. :smileyhappy:

Re: What's on your plate?

^^^I second the recipe request!

Re: What's on your plate?

Yesterday's dinner was sushi at a conveyor belt sushi restaurant and tonight I have cod...now sure if I'm going to fry it or bake it.

Re: What's on your plate?

I love conveyor belt sushi places!! It's always easy for me to go a little crazy at them :smileywink:

Best,
Randee

Re: What's on your plate?

I always go overboard at those places!!

Re: What's on your plate?

I start grabbing before my butt even touches the seat! Once my family went and we virtually took up all but 3 seats on one side. Later a couple was seated at the last two chairs and I felt so bad for them, we cleaned house on the conveyor before food could even get to the couple. They moved shortly.....my cousins LOVE salmon so needless to say when it came around to our side they grabbed it all. 

 

We did catch on that we were cleaning out the belt and then made it a point to ease up, but still....poor couple :smileytongue:.

Re: What's on your plate?

I'd say if it is breaded to bake it with a marinade on top. If it is just fillets then I'd say fry it.

Re: What's on your plate?

I ended up frying it, coated them with a wet batter made with tempura starch, cold water, onion powder, and Montreal Steak seasoning. Dipped with malt vinegar!

Re: What's on your plate?

[ Edited ]

For dinner we had salmon with asparagus. For the salmon, I broiled it on top of dill pickle slices and sprinkled some dried dill on top of the skin. The salmon was served over a sauce of apricot marmalade, coconut aminos and chili paste.

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Re: What's on your plate?

You are such a creative cook, DiVWA! How did the salmon taste after being broiled on top of the pickles? I am obsessed with pickles so I would probably like this recipe!

Best,
Randee

Re: What's on your plate?

Thanks Randee! It tasted really good! What got me to try it was I was thinking that dill goes so well with seafood, so why not put the fillet on top of a dill pickle slice and cook it that way? The pickle becomes soft from the heat and the fat of the salmon above it but it holds its shape well.

 

I love broiling salmon. I always broil it skin side up because that makes the rich healthy fats melt downward into the fillet. Broiling the skin usually makes it brown and crispy and good to eat.

 

You should definitely try this recipe if you're a pickle lover!

Re: What's on your plate?

I'm definitely trying this!! I'll let you know how it goes! How long did your broil it for? 

Best,
Randee

Re: What's on your plate?

[ Edited ]

Assuming the fillet is 1 inch or bit less, I usually broil for about 12 minutes at very most. I use a brush to put some olive oil on all sides too--not sure if this is needed but that's what I do, as I think it may help it brown better and ensures the fillet won't dry out.

Re: What's on your plate?

The mention of fish skin...drooool

Re: What's on your plate?

If anyone is a fan of A Bit of Fry & Laurie...remember the marmalade skit??? Your mention of marmalade made me think of it, love these two.

Re: What's on your plate?

I love all your dishes Diwva. :smileyhappy: 

Re: What's on your plate?

For lunch today I had a salad that had slivered purple kale, red cabbage and radicchio, all massaged with some roasted hazelnut oil. Then added chopped cucumber, some heated and cut-up leftover maple roasted ham, and a bunch of blueberries.

 

Lately I've been using fruits in my salads, which are a great substitute for tomatoes. The fruit adds a sweetness to the salad and makes every bite satisfying. I always add a protein such as leftover meat or some salmon too. Raw leafy greens need to be massaged with an oil to break them down; this oil is the only "dressing" I use--no vinegar or other thing needs to be added.

 

If you've been bored with salads lately, try some of my tricks.

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Re: What's on your plate?

[ Edited ]

For dinner we had a hamburger with a PB&J theme except we used almond butter instead of peanut butter. The jam is homemade strawberry. The side dish is sweet potato hash browns, which I made for the first time last week.

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burger-almondbuttjam-5-16-2015bEDIT - Copy.jpg

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