Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Reading through the posts here on BT I often come across posters using the description "grandma smell" or "old lady perfume" when describing a scent. It's starting to concern me a bit because I really don't want that to be the thought that pops into someone's head when they catch a bit of my perfume.

 

I wear mostly newer scents by Armani, Dolce&Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, Vera Wang, etc.. But I also have some classics in my collection like YSL Opium, Chanel No19 and Chanel No22.

 

So my question is-- if I wear a fragrance that's been around longer than many Grandma's do you think of your Grandma when I walk by?

 

At 26, that's not my goal when I get dressed in the morning :smileyhappy: 

Should I ditch the classics and stick with the new stuff?

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I fell in love after smelling it! I still have half a bottle of the IM one so I'm in no need for another fragrance!

 

In total, I've run through about 3 or 4 bottles of IM in all the sizes! Anna Sui's Flight of Fancy is like a mild step down from the IM in terms of staying power and price point. It also has rose (rose blossom to be exact), yuzu (it's like a Japanese orange, again, more citrus), and white woods as well, but it also blends lychee, lemon, freesia, magnolia, and a hint of amber and musk. I really like how this one smells and it's very reminiscent of the IM Florale, but after getting a sample and trying it, it disappeared on my skin so quickly! :smileysad: That bummed me out to the extreme. Their roller ball would probably make a good touch up to the IM Floral as it's $18 so it's a touch cheaper than the IM Floral at $25.

 

*Totally enabling for similar rose fragrances...slowly backs away* Haha!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Ha, you are not kidding....

 

I might pass out the next time I look at my "favorites" list...

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

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Coffee beans to help wake you and your nose up from all these scents! :smileytongue:

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I think if you like it stick to it. When I refer to that i think of the elizabeth arden fragrances like red door. Or something my own grandmother would wear. Musky, over powering and kind of like a overly fragrant makeup item

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

oh i love grandma perfumes! mitsuoko, fracas, chanel no 19, poison, shalimar. these are beautiful classics that many consider old-lady. to me, though, they smell like quality and intrigue.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Now I have a clear picture of what the term means when people say it off handedly. I don't think I've ever crossed the line into powdery or rose saturated and I'm also careful not to use too much. Sounds like my classic pics are still relevent too. Thanks for the feedback everyone.

 

@Wendyomgwar and @BlushHoarder-- your choices of what to avoid really made me laugh. Don't worry-- I'm not going there. Last time I walked by an Elizabeth Arden counter the salesperson just rolled her eyes at me and said, "Miss, this isn't for you. The mature ladies shop here." haha...... and White Diamonds, too funny, I can see that old Elizabeth Taylor ad where she gives someone her earrings to place a bet, "These have always brought me luck".  The commercial even smelled musty.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

All too true! I love Estée Lauder skincare products but even on this board many have pointed out that it's a rather old-fashioned brand, lol. Guess I'm just getting to that age!

 

But as others have pointed out everyone is free to wear whatever she chooses :smileywink:

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

White Diamonds

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

My least favorite fragrance of all time...and my grandma loves it! But she didn't want her Opium d'Ete so she let me have it. And Opium is definitely a classic (some would consider "old lady").

 

But for any fragrance, if you like it, think more "rich old lady" rather than just "old lady" (we'd all like to be a rich old lady one day, I'm sure). If it smells good on you (whatever style, even mens fragrance), wear it!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I'm not sure if you've ever smelled Red Door by Elizabeth Arden, I think its something in that category. And as others have said, a strong smell. Grandma doesn't have to be bad, i usually associate it with my grandma!

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

people say grandma smells, like its bad, I disagree, I love the way my grandma smells, she wears Calvin Klein obsession, and I think it smells good. Like all grandmas smell the same? I say stick with what your wearing,  even the Chanel 19 and 22, these scents are classic, and anyone who tells you that you smell like a grandma, is small minded. I think fragrance is an experience and sets a mood, not a age.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

@pinkonyx,  This is a great answer. I agree, grandma doesn't have to be a bad smell. I was just referring to how people use the term when describing fragrance. And of course, not all grandmas smell the same. 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

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I would guess something dramatic and strong smelling also "powdery". It just so happen that the older perfumes are more concentrated (or anything eau de parfum) meant to be used sparingly. A lot of the newer fragrances are eau de toilette so they seem lighter. I think you should stick to what you like!

 

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

i always associate the term with musky

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Ah, a common misconception, however musky scents are "womanly" or "grown up," which I suppose that to a certain demographic may as well be "grandma." But then I think overly sweet smelling scents are "immature" while others simply refer to them as "young." 

 

Ex. I received Purr from a well-meaning friend who went by a SA's suggestion due to the popularity. I tried it and my husband hated it, but some of my students loved it. However when I wear Michael Kors Rose Gold my husband goes nuts but I think it smells a bit too mature for me. So different strokes for different folks and all that :smileyhappy:

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I agree that it's an overwhelming smell of powder or strong rosy smelling scents and there's a big difference in the fragrances you have by YSL and Chanel to me classy scents speak for themselves.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I hoped there would be a good specific explanation here. So powder is the big issue. Roses and straight up florals can be trouble too.  So far my collection is safe :smileyhappy:

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

When I think of grandma scents, a giant puff of talcum powder comes to mind. These scents tend to have a powdery dry down, may have rose as a prominent note, and nary a hint of fruit or spice. It has nothing to do with how long the perfume's been around, just who is more likely to be rocking it, in my opinion.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I now have an image of grandmas worldwide always making an entrance in a giant puff of talcum powder. xD

I think "grandma smell" is definitely in the neighborhood of smelling overpoweringly like rose or lavender--maybe it's just smelling like the scent was dumped on though.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

I also find in addition to the "grandma" scent description aside from the actual smell is the strength and overwhelmingness of the fragrance. I think aging is sometimes correlated with losing or the dulling of one's abilities (eye sight worsens for example) so the sense of smell isn't what it used to be so there may be the tendency to go a bit overboard or maybe even not be as aware that too much is sprayed/applied.

Re: Grandma Perfume-- Please Explain This Description

Then why do young girls at the school I teach in smell like Bath and Bodyworks and/or Victoria's Secret threw up all over them? :smileyvery-happy: I tell them all the time that less is more. Same thing goes for their makeup. And don't get me started with the boys and their Axe products, oy vey!

 

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