nattygirl

Makeup for photos

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Lately, I've noticed that my face REALLY goes stark white in flash photography when I wear foundation with any spf at all, so I've switched to the MUFE HD foundation.  However, my face is still showing up stark white in photos. I'm assuming it's my setting powder... which is a YSL sample, i'm not 100% what it is.  BUT, any ideas as to what else in my makeup routine can be causing this flashback (if not my moisturizer or foundation) and what I can do to combat that? Also, what's a good setting powder for photos? Thanks!

JenBlush

Re: Makeup for photos

Honestly, any foundation with any makeup with cause that to happen. If you use the flash on your phone, or any camera where it is really dark, your face will appear whiter because of that white artificial flash light.( especially the regular and held cameras, not professional cameras, i haven't rest to see if those still turn out white). I have tried everything under the sun. From bb creams, to foundations, to tinted moisturizers, to powder. From 0 SPF to 25+. Made my face more bronze, less bronze. Tried just using concealer and bronzer and i have YET to find anything that actually works for that! I have refrained from wearing any foundation. I have so many in my drawer just collecting dust and getting bad, and so much money wasted, its ridiculous. They all leave that white cast. I just never put anything on my face anymore. Just the eyeshadow and lipstick because of it. Especially when I know there will be pictures taken!

andyhtrieu

Re: Makeup for photos

[ Edited ]
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It's not always the camera's fault. I have a camera from 2008 and a few from 2010 and they have never made my face white. I have noticed that when I use a foundation that is super full coverage (like the KVD foundation), it makes my face super pasty and unnatural in pictures. 

 

Last year, I used the Estee Lauder Double Wear in the shade 3W1 Tawny. I tested flash photography with it and it was pasty. This year, I tried the Double Wear again, but in the shade 3W2 Cashew and it looks amazing in pictures. So choosing the right foundation shade is important too!

 

 

nattygirl

Re: Makeup for photos

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I've been using foundations without SPF, like the MUFE HD and Nars Sheer Glow.  Not sure what the YSL powder is called. it was discontinued and given to me by a friend who worked at the counter.

mrsbaine

Re: Makeup for photos

So it's not the new powder that just came out. It could be a number of things; try flashnig pics with and without the powder on. Products are going to react differently on different people so ones opinion on products here may not be fact for another. The best thing you can do is try it for yourself. I've found that I don't get a white cast with the right products for me. But if the color is off, or even if the product is old, I somoetimes get white, or gray. Sometimes I change the combo of products (primer, foundation and settling powder) and they don't play well together causing a white or gray cast. All of this is trial and error at the end of the day. :smileyhappy: 

andyhtrieu

Re: Makeup for photos

[ Edited ]
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It's probably the setting powder because the NARS Sheer Glow looks fine on me in flash photography. If you still experience the white cast, try setting with a tinted powder that matches your skin tone. 

mrsbaine

Re: Makeup for photos

I don't think it's the powder. If you're talking about the new Touche Eclat powder. It's probably the spf in your foundation.  Lylsa's thread she posted below has good info there; I'm sure it will be helpful. 

lylysa

Re: Makeup for photos

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Which YSL powder are you using?

 

I actually just linked the below in another thread, but I think you'll find my response covering flash back in photography useful.

 

http://community.sephora.com/t5/VIB/what-s-the-best-setting-powder-that-does-not-flashback-with/m-p/...

 

It covers the difference and details on how mineral based and silica/HD based powders can read on skin with camera use and how to ensure what you see with your eye is also what picks up and translate well to camera.

 

The above thread also has another thread where I cover extra tips on silica/HD powder use from the amount, tools to apply, and techniques in using various tools.

andyhtrieu

Re: Makeup for photos

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Your link is so long that it doesn't work haha

lylysa

Re: Makeup for photos

[ Edited ]

I just realizes it's because it's under the VIB area of the forum. 

 

But here's the post:

 

There is a wide array of powders that do not cause flashback, the key with any powder is proper usage/application.

 

Mineral powders or powders with a mineral sunscreen (titanium/zinc) are more prone to flashbacks as they form a physical shield on skin to protect against UV rays, this in turns can reflect back the light cast from flash photography; however, there are "camera friendly" brands of mineral powder like Smashbox's HALO (Smashbox is a line designed and tested for photo-safe wear).

 

Mineral powders (for example, Bare Minerals) can be lightly finished with silica based powders (or "high definition/HD powders") to make them camera safe due to the silica particles being used are spherical and help diffuse light around skin/make up for a more even disbursement of lighting and thus giving a more flawless look to skin.

 

The problem with HD/silica powders arise when they are treated and used like a traditional powder (for example, something talc based) that is either translucent or has a slight tint. Traditional powders are essentially "flat" when they're photographed and don't reflect or diffuse like mineral or silica aspects so they're used to touch up, absorb excess moisture in make up, tone down shine, and even layered heavily under the eye if a more dramatic or shadow-heavy look is required to "catch" falling shadow and then all brushed off so that foundation/complexion make up isn't bothered by smudges or shadow traces. Since silica based powders are colorless and so fine in texture, being able to detect a heavy amount is difficult, hence why celebrities have their photos pop up with white blotches of powder on their skin when cameras go flashing. When layered too heavily, the silica spheres just pack on top of one another, not allowing light to be properly dispersed and diffused, hence that chalky/opaque white cast to be reflected.

 

The degree of lighting use also matters greatly in terms of how visible HD powders may be. They can go undetected in natural light/no flash use, but can range from mild to very tell-tale visibility.

 

http://community.sephora.com/t5/Face/Foundation-fo-rmy-wedding-day/m-p/1242070#M16133

 

The above thread has a response I put together that details out more about HD powders and many tips on application and use to avoid flashbacks.

 

With the use of "traditional" powders that aren't heavily mineral based or silica based, the chances for flashback are indeed taken down; however, the lack of flashback doesn't take away all chances for it to still photograph poorly either. Obviously a person's skin and its texture will greatly affect and contribute to how a powder wears, also considering products used in conjunction with the powder; however, an overabundance of powder can give skin a chalky, dry, or even aged look as though no one wants to appear shiny in photos, having too matte of a look can also be associated with not having a vibrancy or natural glow to the skin that is associated with youth. Powders can range in texture and it's always to my preference to suggest finding a powder that feels as smooth to the touch as possible as this means it has undergone a finer milling process, making the particles smaller and more refined, lessening the chances for it to translate poorly during wear. A finely milled powder can feel almost emollient between finger tips, powders that feel gritty or rough won't wear as smooth on the skin.

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    • nattygirl
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    • JenBlush
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