Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Would you consider this palette hoarding?

[ Edited ]

I was at a friends last night and we ended up watching episode after episode of hoarders which was shocking and frightening at the same time. 

Today I read a comment asking to see my makeup collection so I pulled out my palettes out of their respective drawers for a photo and realized I have more than I thought. Also I realized how anxious I was about my hubby coming up and seeing how many I own. needless to say, they went back very quickly! 

I'm wondering if this is too many or if I'm just sitting pretty. I do use them all save for the nars ones. 

how many palettes do you own? do you use them all? image.jpg

 

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Looks like a fair sized stash to meSmiley Happy.  I honestly can say I don't need so many palettes but they're fun to have on hand.

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

As my own obsession interest in makeup has grown I have decided that only can answer the question for myself if I have "too much." For me, makeup is an art, and I hardly think anyone would tell a painter they have too many paints or too many brushes. Part of the joy of it is having a selection to choose from to be able to do my makeup how I wish to on any given day. I work hard in my life and don't do much else for myself, so I am ok with it. Smiley Happy

 

if I find I am not using something or have lost interest, I do try to find it a new home. Makeup is perishable over time. That's why I love the trade threads and TSBs, etc. 

 

I don't hide makeup from the hubby but I wouldn't let him give me a hard time for it either. He has like 18 different kinds of hammers - he recently ordered one that was about $100. I asked him how it was different from the other 17 in the toolbox drawer of hammers. While my eyes did glaze over rather quickly and my mind drifted to other matters, such as what might be The Perfect color orange for a lipstick, I did get from the conversation that the particular hammer would do something unique that the others could not. I further inquired how often he might use it, which I learned was rather rarely, but when he needed it, it was the right tool for the job. Sound familiar? Smiley Happy

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

My husband just doesn't get that he spends the same as me each month but on different things ... I've given up pointing it out ...

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

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My husband doesn't say anything about my makeup collection because as much as he thinks I have a makeup problem, I think he has a sports problem.  Do there REALLY need to be THAT many sports channels?  To him, yes.  Do I REALLy need more makeup?  Of course!

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

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All those games make him happy.  All my goodies make me happy.  So how can we call them silly?

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

You are always so eloquent, Syd.  I love your perspective and think it is very healthy.  I personally feel that I could never have too much (sure we all secretly feel that way).  I like the hammer analogy, because my husband does tease me about my collection but he has plenty of things he spends money on.  It certainly isn't hammers, because he does not really know how to use one, but he spends plenty nonetheless.  

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

amen!!!!

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Thank you for putting this into perspective. I have purchased A LOT of makeup over the last year. I didn't start playing around with makeup until about 7-8 months ago. The hubby is always asking me how much money I am spending, why I need this, why I need that, etc. 

The way I look at it, makeup is something that I enjoy. I have a 4 (almost 5) year-old son with special needs (Autism). For a long time I did nothing but work and try to get my son the help he needs. We were in speech therapy 2x/week (still are) and we had a behavior specialist and mental health specialist come into our home to observe and kind of guide us through dealing with some of the behavioral problems we were experiencing. For a long time I couldn't leave the house with my son. We couldn't take him to the store, to a restaurant or anywhere else because he would become so overwhelmed and over-stimulated that he would act out (yell, scream, hit, kick) the entire time. The specialist that we had in our home helped us get through those times.  

My son has come leaps and bounds in the last 6 months. He is almost fully conversational which is a HUGE relief for me. We spent so long communicating with pictures on "choice boards". And now that my son's verbal and communicative skills have improved, so has his behavior. He is less frustrated and acts out less frequently now that he can communicate his needs. SUCH a relief!

I've spent the last 4 (almost 5) years trying my hardest to get my son involved in every service possible. I was focusing so much on my son that I forgot about myself. Now that my son has come leaps and bounds and is continuously improving, I have more time to focus on myself. Enter makeup and skin care. =0) 

I feel guilty for making purchases when my husband asks me about them. My husband is ALWAYS buying tools for work and bullets so that he can go to the gun range in his free time. I've tried to explain the importance of makeup and skin care (to me) and he just doesn't get it. So thank you for putting this into perspective.

Today I have a level of self confidence that I have never had. I know makeup isn't the only thing in the world that contributes to self esteem but I love being able to look in the mirror and think "**bleep**, I look pretty today!" or "Wow, my skin looks fabulous!" 

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

What you have done for your son is incredible. You absolutely deserve to spoil yourself with makeup treats! I have High Functioning Asperger's now, but as a very young child, it was almost classic autism, except I always could talk to communicate too easily for this diagnosis. My mother gave up a lot to help me, and I can never thank her sufficiently, so I have so much respect for what you've done. Now my youngest daughter has ODD, so it's me dealing with this challenge, and though she improves year on year, it is exhausting at times, and immensely demoralizing. Makeup and skincare are my main treats to myself, too Smiley Happy

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Thank you so much! It's really awesome to hear that other moms are going through what I'm going through (or similar).

You, yourself, have Asperger's? I always worry about what my son's future will look like; in terms of getting married and having children. And even earlier than that, will he have friends in school? Will kids bully him or say mean things to him? Will he get to go to the prom? It's reassuring to see an adult who has had similar experiences go on to have a family and be succesful professionally - And if I'm not mistaken, from what I read in my thread about careers, you are VERY successful. 

I, too, have experience dealing with ODD - but in a professional setting rather than personal (when I was working with juvenile offenders in a correctional facility). It's very frustrating and both emotionally and physically draining. So kudos to you for working with your daughter 24/7 and it's great to hear that she's progressing! 

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

I think I'm a good example of just how much can be achieved if you work at it. When I started kindergarten my lack of facial recognition ability was so dreadful that for 3 years I assumed I had new children in my class everyday. I assumed I had a new teacher everyday. It was a very surreal and confusing time. 

 

By grade school I had begun to recognize people due to strategies my mom taught me. I wasn't good at making friends, and my developmental delay was severe, so by the time I reached middle school the fact I was childish and enjoyed playing with dolls the other kids had abandoned long ago did not make me popular. 

 

I was also severely impacted by lack of coordination, and lack of spatial awareness, so by the time I was 6 I'd already broken my ankles 5 times just trying to run. Other kids tried to teach me, but my mom enrolling me in ballet and figure skating was solely responsible for the growth of my skills in these areas.

 

I also wasn't sure about the point of school. I loved learning, but no one told me my teachers were trying to impart knowledge I'd value, so until I was 16, I mostly ignored them and drew compulsively through every class. I was seen as super smart but weird. Again not the best formula for popularity, and it did bother me.

 

At 17, I started AP's and finally got the point of school. I graduated Harvard UG and Graduate schools, but had to spend 13 years taking driving lessons every week before my brain linked up in the ways I needed it to in order to enable me to pass the driving test, or to drive safely, which was more important.

 

While in college I competed on the varsity figure skating team. All those years of training had helped my movement issues tremendously, and my coordination, too. I made friends - real friends - for the first time, because loads of people were as nerdy as me.

 

I've felt like all my life, I keep challenging myself, and trying to get my brain to forge new links, and it kind of works. Of course, like all autistic people, I hate change, but I actually go out of my way to create change in my life, because my abilities keep improving in consequence. I've been doing this since my late twenties.

 

Based on my experiences, I don't think there's much limit to what children on the autistic spectrum can go on to accomplish, especially once they're using speech to communicate Smiley Happy

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Wow. That really gives me some insight into how my son's brain works sometimes. Even with all the reading I've done, I'm still not sure I really get what Asperger's is all about. I worry about him a lot. He's super smart with an incredible vocabulary. When they tested him in grade school he came close to having a genius IQ. Which is why it's so frustrating that he can speak like a college student and still forget to wipe after using the bathroom (hopefully not too graphic, folks!). Your post gives me a lot of hope for him. He does well in school and made honor roll this past term. Keeping my fingers crossed. Thanks!

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

It's funny. I felt so exposed after posting the above, almost as though I'd posted a naked picture of myself online.

 

I guess I don't actually share the truth with too many people these days, but I wanted to give examples that would help you see that from being really severely debilitated by being on the spectrum as a child, it is entirely possible your son will grow and grow in abilities and understandings, until he is unrecognizable by the time he's in his mid-twenties. 

 

The one career no one who met me as a child or teenager would have ever thought me capable of was counseling, yet communication and empathy continually improve, and I've liked being able to buck the trend of the sort of careers those on the spectrum are assumed to mostly go into by forging a successful career in Clinical Psychology and Guidance Counseling Smiley Happy

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

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Thank you so much for sharing your story, ballerinagrl! =0)

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Mothers in general give so much of themselves, often doing without. We always seem to put everyone before ourselves. I look at the makeup as something we deserve every now and then, not only to treat ourselves, but to give an often needed boost to self confidence and self esteem.

 

Also, so very glad to hear about your son. I know how frustrating that can be. One of my 11-year-old twins has Asperger's and guiding him can be quite challenging at times.

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Thank you! It is definitely a challenge sometimes but totally worth it =0)

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

[ Edited ]

Oh my gosh, I know EXACTLY what you go through!  My 12 year old has autism and wasn't verbal until he was five!  I remember the choice boards with the little pictures and the Velcro backsSmiley Happy. We were seeing so many specialists and therapists there was no time to do anything else!  Then things exploded and he just started babbling!  He's pretty reserved but will follow you around talking about the parts inside his phones if you make the slightest comment on them😂. He loves technology!  People give him their old broken phones and have been for years so he has quite the collection.  He now asks us to order special parts for them and restores them to their former glory.   We since discovered that a lot of our successful friends fall on the spectrum and he's going to thrive as an adult in the real world which has always been my number one fear for him (we're in the computer security realm) 

Anyways if you ever wanna talk pm meSmiley Happy   And DO take care of yourself!!  

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Thank you very much, heartsmyface. 

My kiddo loves technology too. He can navigate an iPad better than I can. He also has a thing for numbers - he can remember numbers like nobody's business! I have high hopes for him. =0)

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

. Tech is easier than people cause once you've learned how the system works it never changes and is predictable.  Whatever he chooses to get interested in I am certain he will become an expert in that field.  They say if you were to spend one hour a day reading about one topic that interests you you will become an expert.   He has long since surpassed me in knowledge about phones. It used to be meerkats when he was really small(which incidentally he was introduced to through Telus ads), and somewhere between here and there it was smoke detectors.  Oh how he the loves things that emit radiation!  

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Congratulations on your son's progress!  You sound like a devoted and loving family; it's exciting to hear the strides he's made! Smiley Happy

 

I agree we should ALL have the opportunity to do things for ourselves, especially if it makes us feel good.

 

Regarding the costs at the range....ammo is super expensive!  I know one needs to keep up with practice as it's a perishable skill, however, unless he is reloading (using his discharged brass to refill at home with more bullets), ammo above 22 is not cheap.  Plinking several hundreds of rounds into a sand berm can hardly compare to, say, a beautiful eyeshadow palette that will provide happiness, joy, and beauty for several years.  Smiley Wink  You are welcome to quote me, because I have done both.  Smiley Very Happy  Not that I would judge someone who goes to the range, no more than I would want them to judge me for collecting pretties.  Smiley Happy

 

Again, congrats on  your son's progress, as well as your own attention on your skincare and makeup that is providing you with more self esteem and happiness.  Smiley Very Happy

 

 

Re: Would you consider this palette hoarding?

Thank you so much! =0)

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