andyhtrieu

SPF question

How do I know if the SPF in a moisturizer or foundation is powerful enough to protect my skin from the sun? I use a separate moisturizer with SPF 30 and I don't rely on foundation as my only source of sun protection

 

On Beautypedia, Paula and her team rates some foundations, BB creams, etc. as poor because it doesn't provide sufficient protection, even if it has SPF. I know that she isn't very well liked on BT and some of the sources that she uses are from the early 2000s. 

 

Help?

 

 

hipquest

Re: SPF question

(0) Hearts

I use Ole Henriksen Protect the Truth spf 50+ but I ALWAYS wear a hat when I'm outside for any extended time. A true physical barrier works better than anything you rub/spray on.

rjamlt

Re: SPF question

I'm one that does not ever rely on my makeup to protect my skin. I think of the UVB and UVA and UVburn and UVage. I haven't found a make up product out there that can adequately address both those without needed to over apply. I like to think of any SPF in my makeup as more of a bonus protection rather than the main source. 

kenny

Re: SPF question

I generally never rely on makeup for full protection form the sun. As others mentioned, you have to use a LOT to get sufficient coverage. Same goes for moisturizers with SPF, that you have to use a lot (but that is much easier to do than with foundation). 

 

As for Paula, I don't think it's a matter of being liked, as just taking her opinions with a grain of salt. Yes she can be helpful in certain cases, but her recommendations don't necessarily apply to everyone.

drrragon

Re: SPF question

[ Edited ]

That's a really good question.  It took me years to realize that not all sunscreens are the same.  The SPF rating only describes how good a sunscreen is at blocking UVB rays.  In the US there is no consistent rating system for UVA rays (which are the ones causing wrinkles, increasing risk of skin cancer, and penetrate clouds so you need protection even on cloudy days).  Paula's ratings are based on whether the sunscreen contains UVA blockers as well as UVB blockers.  In terms of chemical sunscreen, typical ingredients are oxybenzone, homosalate, octinoxate, etc.  These block UVB rays but not UVA.  When Paula complains that a sunscreen doesn't have enough protection, she usually means that it's lacking enough/any ingredients that protect you against UVA rays.  The most common UVA-blocking chemical sunscreen ingredient (in the US) is avobenzone.  However, avobenzone tends to break down when exposed to light, so you need a concentration of at least 3%.  It's even better if octocrylene is included, since that has a stabilizing effect on the avobenzone.

 

 

Physical blockers such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are great because they effectively block both UVA and UVB rays.  I've read that you need at least a 3% concentration but the more the better, really.  What I use around my eyes is a 17% zinc oxide sunscreen from Obagi (when it comes to sunscreen I err on the side of caution!).  Another great thing about physical blockers is that they're often found in powder foundations or powder form which makes it easy for makeup wearers to touch up their sunscreen in the middle of the day.

 

 
For a great explanation about the difference between UVA and UVB check skincancer.org or google for shining-light-on-ultraviolet-radiation

kemoca

Re: SPF question

17 percent exists? Does it sting and/or make your face super white? I don't think I've seen anything over like 7%.

drrragon

Re: SPF question

(0) Hearts

OMG jerri blank! LOL!!!

drrragon

Re: SPF question

Nope, doesn't sting at all (chemical sunscreens might sting but physical ones shouldn't).  It is thicker than I like (that's why I only use it for my eye area) but it doesn't make me look ghostly or anything.  These days there are newer "micronized" zinc oxide sunscreens that are much less thick than the old fashioned ones, I guess because of new technology that lets them get the mineral particles much smaller than before.  Worth looking into!

kemoca

Re: SPF question

(0) Hearts

thanks for the info! i just saw this now. 

 

glad to see jerri blank, my makeup antihero, getting some love. 

andyhtrieu

Re: SPF question

(0) Hearts

I also found out that foundations with a high amount of titanium dioxide and iron oxide will flash back in photography. 

andyhtrieu

Re: SPF question

thanks for your help!

ShinyMagpie

Re: SPF question

I wish I could give this response more than one heart. Excellent information. :smileyhappy:

drrragon

Re: SPF question

aww thanks sweetie :smileyhappy:  you can tell I'm an ingredients-scrutinizing nerd!

oklady2013

Re: SPF question

I personally use a separate all mineral sunscreen as well as a

primer with sunscreen. It's just my preference.

ChicDabbler

Re: SPF question

Less a matter of well liked but more of a matter that she's very opinionated and view things from a very specific/narrow perspective, so what she says is useful but should be taken with a grain of salt.

 

As for SPF, if I remember correctly, you need a quarter size for face and a shot glass for the body (or at least that's what most ppl recommend). Can you imagine putting on that much foundation/BB cream? that's why most of the time SPF in moisturizer is ok while those in makeup is not, since you put on more moisturizer than makeup. Aside from the amount, you should ideally reapply every couple of hours if you are outdoors the whole day. As for the numbers, SPF 15 blocks about 94% of UVB rays; SPF 30 blocks 97%; and SPF 45 blocks about 98%. After that it's just silly, which is why the sunscreen regulation from FDA (last yr? 2yrs ago?) made companies change the claim from "waterproof" to "water resistant" and you don't see SPF100 anymore since it's meaningless after SPF55 I think.

 

Now, that's the recommended stuff. I just make sure to apply moisturizer with SPF generously in the morning, don't care about spf in makeup. Since I work indoors I don't actually reapply SPF (altho I do at beach) and just wash it off at night. And I usually go for spf 15-35 since too much sunscreen changes the texture of the moisturizer so I don't go higher unless I'm spending the day outside.

andyhtrieu

Re: SPF question

thanks for the info!

ChicDabbler

Re: SPF question

ps. Also, I do not believe in judging makeup by the amount of SPF it contains. That's like judging a food by its color. Of course it's a nice bonus, but it's not the point. BB cream/foundation are meant to provide coverage, so giving it a low rating based on spf is kind of silly, in my opinion of course.

katie1724

Re: SPF question

I use the same logic that you do for foundation about moisturizers with sunblock -- I think they help, but I prefer to use a straight sunscreen, rather than a moisturizer with sunscreen, in order to obtain a higher SPF. Since moisturizer can be rich, most people don't apply it liberally enough to achieve the full sun protection factor. I obviously can't speak for everyone (or for all moisturizers, some of which are better than others!), but for me, I'd rather take the extra step and use sunscreen. 

Advanced
You must be signed in to add attachments
Conversation Stats
  • 17 replies
  • 634 views
  • 56 hearts
  • 10 in conversation
    • katie1724
    • kenny
    • drrragon
    • ChicDabbler
    • hipquest
    • oklady2013
    • rjamlt
    • ShinyMagpie
    • kemoca
    • andyhtrieu